Sommières, 2000 ans d’Histoire...

The presence of Vidourle coastal river, and the possibility of a passage to the region of the Causses (ford), have since the earliest times attracted the man who moved to this location. Discoveries upstream of the valley (caves, prehistoric flint cutting plants) suggests that humans lived on this site for several millennia ...

In the first century AD, Emperor Tiberius built the bridge of 22 arches and 189 feet long to allow the passage of the Roman road from Nimes and heading to Toulouse and Lodeve. The actual origins of the city are closely related to that of the house Bermand Anduze and Sauve. Sommières appears, indeed, in our history of the south,it its present on location. In the eleventh century, as Lord Bernard Anduze III. In 1041, an act was drafted and signed by him in his castle at Sommières. This castle was built on the rocky outcrop overlooking the ancient Roman road and Vidourle, probably towards the end of the tenth century or at the beginning of the XI. There remain a stately square tower and a large part of the walls ...

In the Middle Ages, the population was clustered at the foot of the castle which gave him refuge, protection and defense. Economic activity in the city, turned first to the agriculture and livestock, then turned to the work of skins and hides. The herds were numerous in our region, oaks provided the tannin is essential for this activity also required a lot of water, which would explain why tanners and tanners will be installed as close as possible Vidourle and even in the riverbed . However, fearing the flood that had been customary, the people built their houses on arcade-style novel, and is the architecture that characterizes the lower part of the city and the streets perpendicular forming a perfect grid. At the royal takeover in the Languedoc, the lords of Sommières sided with the Count of Toulouse, Raymond VII, in which they were related. They were defeated and King Louis IX (St. Louis) links the city to the royal domain in 1248.



In the sixteenth century, the majority of the population embraced the Protestant religion. The city then lived the drama of religious wars. Twice besieged by the same Marshal Damville, future Duke of Montmorency in 1573 (on behalf of Catholics) in 1575 (on behalf of Protestants), it was virtually destroyed, "only 38 houses remained extremely poor standing. " In the next century, there were still problems and it was Louis XIII who in 1622 at the head of his army, came to besiege Sommières. The city surrendered after a brief defense. A print depicting the siege, is the national library in Paris. The Duke of Rohan, known for head of the reformed churches of the province, took the city in July 1625, but was soon chased by the troops of M. de Valen, governor of Montpellier ...


The last battle dates back to 1703. Jean Cavalier, a leader of the Camisards, head of 800 men, made a foray into the outshirts of Sommieres, he then retrented without being able to enter. After the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, the castle was transformed into a prison and then were  locked up there in turn, Protestant, captured soldiers, sailors, English or Dutch, political prisoners, convicts and even "whores". After the revolutionary upheaval, the castle was abandoned. Its ruins testify to its strategic importance over the centuries. The tower "Patrimoine Communal" was recently restored and can be visited.


The Tourist Office organizes Sommières since 2008 very original tours that trace the history of Sommieres.
  The story of the guide through a circuit in the streets of the city is punctuated by eruptions of curious characters who seem to spring from the past and lead you into the wild imaginings very nice and give even more attractive and attention to visit ..




04.66.80.99.30                             Cie la Puce qui Renifle

 

Office du Tourisme

SommièresVideo_Sommieres_2.html

28/01/2011

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